What Causes Cloudy Water From A Faucet?

20 August 2013
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Although I normally use a filter system for my water, the filter needs to be replaced and so I was relegated to drinking faucet water. Usually I don’t mind, but when I filled a glass of water from the faucet it was cloudy. I poured it out thinking it may have just been a while since I last used the faucet. But the second glass of water turned out the same. This time, I let the glass sit out for a while to see what would happen. After a couple of minutes, the cloudiness went away and the water cleared up. Having conducted some research on just
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why my faucet water was cloudy, I discovered that it’s not a bad thing. In fact, it’s not bad at all. The cloudiness is actually a million tiny air bubbles. Those air bubbles are caused by the water distribution system, which is under pressure and causes air that’s present to be dissolved into the water. The only way for the air to be released is to release the pressure, which is what happens when you turn the faucet on. For small amounts of air dissolved in the water, then only a few tiny bubbles will show up. However, if there is a lot of air dissolved in the water, the pressure released is greater. As a result, the water from your faucet will look white, milky, or cloudy. Give it a few minutes for the air to escape. professional essay In most cities, in 90% of water distribution systems contain dissolved air. Moreover, during the pumping process, air may also enter the distribution system. Check all your sink faucets. If you find that the other faucets produce clear water, then the original sink faucet is the source of air. custom essay writing service reviews

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